Understanding PTSD

Updated: Mar 5

How well do we understand PTSD? Is it only members of the military that have PTSD? How does one receive help when they have suffered PTSD?



During World War I and II doctors were seeing men coming from the front line with what they called shell-shock. These men had nightmares, night terrors, replayed traumatic events over and over again, and once triggered felt they were right back to the event that caused the trauma.


Today we call this PTSD or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. We are now aware of what happens to a soldier when he/she sees combat. What we are also beginning to understand is that it is not just members of the military who have PTSD.


Children who have been witnesses to abuse, either physical, emotional, or sexual, can have symptoms of PTSD. Children have been neglected also have symptoms of PTSD. People who have been in car accidents, witnessed natural disasters, and women who have been rape have symptoms of PTSD.


These symptoms can be pervasive, and hinder a person from living a healthy, and normal life. It can cause problems on the job, in a marriage, and with friends. The people around a person with PTSD feel as if they have to "walk on egg shells" in order not to trigger the person. This causes tension in the relationship.


A person with PTSD needs help. Weekly counseling, and finding a support group are just two ways in reach a person with PTSD can get help.